7 Common Kitchen Appliance Myths

Most Americans own basic kitchen appliances like a refrigerator, oven, and stove. Some are even lucky enough to own a dishwasher or a separate freezer. While appliances offer a lot of convenience to our modern lives, they can also be expensive to repair or replace. In order to properly care for your appliances, you need to know how they work. Here are seven common misconceptions you might encounter when learning about kitchen appliances.

Most Americans own basic kitchen appliances like a refrigerator, oven, and stove. Some are even lucky enough to own a dishwasher or a separate freezer. While appliances offer a lot of convenience to our modern lives, they can also be expensive to repair or replace. In order to properly care for your appliances, you need to know how they work. Here are seven common misconceptions you might encounter when learning about kitchen appliances.

Myth #1: Refrigerators cool off the food stored inside.

Truth: The refrigerator keeps your food cool by removing hot air inside the compartment and emptying it into the room through a condenser.

Myth #2: The refrigerator thermostat determines how much cool air is released.

Truth: The temperature inside your refrigerator varies quite a bit. For instance, it might move from 10 to 38 degrees. When the thermostat hits 38 degrees, the compressor kicks on and begins cooling it down. When it reaches 10 degrees, the compressor stops. The result is a pretty consistent temperature for food stored inside and the refrigerator isn’t constantly running.

Myth #3: Broken dishwashers require a plumber.

Truth: Call an appliance repair specialist. The plumber isn’t trained in the intricacies of dishwasher repair. Unless you are having a problem with your pipes or waterline, skip the plumber and call an appliance repair technician.

Myth #4: You need a new dishwasher if water remains in the bottom after a cycle is complete.

Truth: Leftover water is actually a good thing! By leaving a little water behind, your dishwasher keeps seals moistened to prevent cracks. Any cracks will lead to major leaks so don’t panic when you see that excess water. When you turn on the dishwasher, it empties for the first few seconds and then refills with clean water.

Myth #5: Dishwashers have a pump to supply water to the interior for washing.

Truth: When you fill up the dishwasher, a water valve opens to allow water to flow inside. The pump is used to push water out when the cycle is finished.

Myth #6: A dishwasher fills until a small float inside rises to a preset level.

Truth: Today’s dishwashers have automatic filling timers instead of floatation devices. Some machines do have an emergency float that signals the dishwasher to stop if it starts to overfill.

Myth #7: The thermostat determines the total amount of electric current an oven will use at any given time.

Truth: The electric current is always at the same level and cannot be changed. The oven shuts the current off and on depending on the thermostat’s setting. For example, when you set the oven at 350 degrees, the current will go on and off to keep the temperature in a range of 325 to 375 degrees. If your oven is not keeping the correct temperature, you made need to call an oven repair specialist.